Port Arthur hosts Taiwanese World Heritage visit

February 3, 2016

The Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority (PAHSMA) hosted senior leaders from the heritage conservation sector in Taiwan. The delegation toured Port Arthur enjoying an opportunity to share knowledge and experiences related to the conservation of cultural heritage places.

From left: Dr Alex Ya-Neng Yen, Associate Professor, Department of Architecture and the Director, Centre for Cultural Sites Rehabilitation and Development, China University of Technology; Mr Stephen Large, CEO, PAHSMA; Mr Gwo-Long Shy, the Director-General of the Taiwanese Bureau of Cultural Heritage, Ministry of Culture, Government of the Republic of China; Mr Ian Cook, AusHeritage Ltd; Dr Jane Harrington, Director Conservation & Infrastructure, PAHSMA.

From left: Dr Alex Ya-Neng Yen, Associate Professor, Department of Architecture and the Director, Centre for Cultural Sites Rehabilitation and Development, China University of Technology; Mr Stephen Large, CEO, PAHSMA; Mr Gwo-Long Shy, the Director-General of the Taiwanese Bureau of Cultural Heritage, Ministry of Culture, Government of the Republic of China; Mr Ian Cook, AusHeritage Ltd; Dr Jane Harrington, Director Conservation & Infrastructure, PAHSMA.

The visit was made possible by a grant awarded to AusHeritage Ltd, Australia’s network for promoting the Australian heritage industry internationally, by the Australia-China Council. As well as Port Arthur, the visit  focused on inspections of and meetings with management at key World Heritage sites including the Sydney Opera House, the Royal Exhibition Building and Carlton Gardens and other World Heritage-listed convict sites such as Cockatoo Island and Hyde Park Barracks.

Taiwanese cultural heritage delegation representatives inspect Port Arthur's largest archaeological excavation behind the iconic Penitentiary.

Taiwan representatives inspect Port Arthur’s largest archaeological excavation behind the iconic Penitentiary.

The purpose of their visit is to examine how World Heritage Sites are managed in Australia and identify relevant approaches that may be adopted as Taiwan establishes World Heritage level assessment and management standards for several of its significant and diverse cultural heritage sites.

Mr Stephen Large, PAHSMA CEO, stated: ‘We welcome opportunities such as this visit to not only provide support for other regional heritage initiatives, but also to work with our colleagues and reflect on our own approaches to best-practice heritage management’.

Mr Large also noted ‘With our growing numbers of Chinese speaking visitors it was valuable to exchange ideas about both conservation and tourism initiatives’.